American Sign Language (SIGN)

American Sign Language (ASL), SIGN (as it’s called at Bucknell) is taught to students with little or no knowledge of ASL and Deaf Culture. SIGN provides students with the skills needed to communicate comfortably in a wide variety of situations. Discussions include basic fingerspelling techniques, ASL grammatical structures, non-manual markers, and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on developing proper expressive and receptive skills.

Necessary grammatical structuring is emphasized more heavily in level two, although it’s a key component in level one so students understand how to produce grammatically correct ASL. Cultural information is taught throughout the class so students learn to feel comfortable interacting with the Deaf community in a way that is respectful and aware. Linguistic and social behaviors are vital for expressing oneself accurately in ASL. SIGN also explores current events and/or historical events about deafness or Deaf culture and students are encouraged to research these issues and reflect upon them. ASL is among the leading minority languages in the United States and this course explores the diverse ways students can apply their new knowledge of ASL in any career field.

Courses

SIGN 101. Elementary American Sign Language I. .5 Credits.

Offered Both Fall and Spring; Lecture hours:2
An introduction to American Sign Language. Training and practice in signing together with approaches to communicating with deaf people.

SIGN 102. Elementary American Sign Language II. .5 Credits.

Offered Both Fall and Spring; Lecture hours:2
An introduction to American Sign Language. Training and practice in signing together with approaches to communicating with deaf people. Prerequisite: SIGN 101 or equivalent.

Faculty

Lecturer: Sarah S. Moore

Instructional Assistant: Lisa Biddinger